ClickBank The Exodus Effect – Scam Or Legit? You Decide!

Exodus-effect.com is a website that promotes The Exodus Effect system. The system holds some of the world’s unanswered secrets regarding anointing oils, according to the website content.

ClickBank Promotion

The Exodus Effect is promoted by ClickBank. Consumers need to be fully aware of the ClickBank marketplace. While ClickBank is a registered Idaho business, the legitimacy of its affiliate program is questionable.

ClickBank promotes thousands of digital and physical goods, such as supplements, art, fashionable items, and many more.

Fake Endorsements And Customer Reviews

The ClickBank affiliate utilizes fake customer reviews and endorsements. For example, the Adele S. review, which shows to have been written “yesterday” replicates a Pinterest image, posted by Hebalistpain.com. The same image can be found on the website, Bioforce.health.blog.

Image: Exodus-effect.com
Image: Pinterest

The image utilized for the Bob G. customer review is a Shutterstock image, which can be found on various websites.

Image: Exodus-effect.com
Image: Google Search

Website Information

The website was registered by NameSilo, LLC on June 14, 2021.

Image: WhoIs

ClickBank Payment Processor

ClickBank affiliates do not handle the payment process. ClickBank is responsible for payment and refund processing. The company claims to offer a 60-day return policy for this affiliate product.

Image: Exodus-effect.com

Prayer Warrior Network Subscription

Every customer who purchases The Exodus Effect can join the Prayer Warrior Network for a one-time fee of $9.95. If you visit Prayerwarriornetwork.wordpress.com and try to subscribe, you will get an ERROR 404 code. However, you can subscribe to the program by signing up for free newsletters. Visitors can also leave questions and comments for free.

After carefully reviewing the website, there does not appear to be a fee for any of the services provided by the Prayer Warrior Network. The website does not even have a donation page. Makes one question why the ClickBank affiliate is charging a fee for the service.

Online Visibility

Online visibility for The Exodus Effect is limited to paid reviews and press releases. The vendor has definitely done his homework.

ClickBank BBB 1.73-Star Customer Rating

ClickBank is accredited by BBB, which explains its A+ rating, with 89 customer complaints. This high volume of BBB complaints should be enough to deter consumers from buying ClickBank products. Most of the complaints are regarding return and refund issues. It is not unusual for a ClickBank affiliate to try avoiding returns. Each return is a lost sale.

It appears ClickBank takes BBB complaints seriously, offering refunds without further delay.

Dr. Sula Benet

A Google search led to 20th-century anthropologist Sara Benetowa “Sula Benet”. Benet was born in Warsaw on September 23, 1903. She spent her life studying philosophy and literature. Benet believe the biblical term “calamus” was in reference to hemp. Benet died at the age of 79 in 1982.

There is no evidence to connect Sula Benet to The Exodus Effect.

ClickBank Supplements

It is important to note, ClickBank vendors are average people, they are not pharmaceutical companies. Nearly every vendor bases its claims on CDC, Healthline, and NIH research. While these studies are conducted by reliable sources, they have no connection whatsoever with ClickBank supplements. These are independent studies, not ClickBank studies.

At least ClickBank is willing to accept the downfall of its affiliate supplements. Check out the BBB complaint and response provided below.

One BBB complaint drew our attention. The complaint was filed on July 8, 2021, regarding a supplement. The complainant claimed to have purchased supplements from a ClickBank vendor and experienced side effects, such as vomiting after ingesting the probiotic. After reaching out to the vendor multiple times, the customer filed a BBB complaint.

Image: BBB

What is so interesting about the complaint is ClickBank’s response. The company did not hesitate to refund the customer for her purchase. The response is provided below:

Image: BBB

Other BBB complaints are regarding unauthorized credit card charges. The complainants claimed to have been charged multiple times for the same order. If you have ever tried to utilize ClickBank’s payment processor, you may have experienced the same issue. Some of the affiliate websites have glitchy checkout processes. Use caution when buying from a ClickBank vendor.

On a good note, ClickBank is working with the complainants to resolve the BBB complaints. The real question is why the customers must take such drastic measures. Why weren’t the complaints resolved by the vendor, if not, ClickBank without BBB involvement?

Summary – The Exodus Effect Scam

Is The Exodus Effect a scam? There is no evidence to support such claims. The vendor claims to hold the secrets of anointing oil. If you know anything about prayer anointing oil, you know most religious organizations opt to utilize traditional olive oil, which is anointed in front of a congregation. Every member of the congregation lay their hands on the olive oil, at which time, it becomes a powerful anointing oil.

You must remember, this is nothing more than a ClickBank affiliate making such claims. There is no science to back the vendor’s claims.

It cannot be stressed enough, ClickBank vendors are not licensed physicians, scientists, pharmacists, or other professionals. There is no connection with The Exodus Effect to Sula Benet. The vendor claims the works were created by Pastor Andrew. A Google search does not offer much information about Pastor Andrew or Divine Origins. Google search returned only paid reviews and press releases. There may or may not be a living, breathing Pastor Andrew of Divine Origins.

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