Herpesyl: A BuyGoods Supplement With False Cure Claims

Herpesyel.com is an online supplement vendor. Herpesyl is designed to weaken the Herpes Simplex Virus “HSV,” according to the vendor website.

About The Vendor

BuyGoods is the face behind Herpesyl. BuyGoods Inc. is registered with the State of Delaware as a domestic corporation.

Image: State of Delaware Business Verification

Not Accredited By BBB

BuyGoods is registered, not accredited, with BBB. Being registered with BBB means the company has a BBB filing, nothing more or nothing less. The BBB filing provides the contact information 1201 N. Orange Street, Suite 7223, Wilmington, DE 19801. The company is not physically located at the aforementioned address, instead, 800 W. Main St, Ste 1460, Boise, ID 83702. A Google search connects the Boise address to Davinci Virtual Office, a virtual office solution.

Image: BBB
Image: BBB

BuyGoods is owned by Ms. Franziska Jones. Mr. Sohall Anwar is the Chief Risk Officer, according to the BBB filing.

BuyGoods has a 3.38-star BBB customer rating and A- BBB rating. In the last year, BuyGoods has resolved 29 customer complaints and 41 in the last 3 years. The customer complaints are regarding refund issues, refusal to stop spam emails, negative side effects, fake customer reviews, and ineffective supplements.

Trustpilot 3.0-Star Rating

BuyGoods has a 3.0-star Trustpilot customer rating. The low rating is linked to customer complaints regarding misleading information, refund issues, mass spam emails, ineffective Silencil, and shipping issues.

Image: Trustpilot

Herpesyl BuyGoods BBB Complaint

Surfing through BuyGoods’ BBB reviews, we came across a review that was very interesting, to say the least. The review, written by Jeremy R., pretty much sums up BuyGoods and other unofficial supplement vendors.

Image: Trustpilot

The review touches on the Disclaimer, in which, BuyGoods claims the statements on its site are not “evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.” Jeremy claims BuyGoods covers up negative customer reviews by flooding the Internet with paid affiliate reviews. He refers to BuyGoods are running a “classic affiliate marketing scam”.

Image: BBB

Not putting words in the author’s mouth, it appears, he is saying BuyGoods is preying on vulnerable, unaware consumers.

BuyGoods responded to the review, claiming its supplements do not cure, only provide nourishment. Jeremy is not ready to quit yet. He responds to BuyGoods, calling the response “disingenuous.” BuyGoods does claim Herpesyl “can kill every trace of herpes from your body.”

Image: Herpesyl.com

Irrelevant Research

BuyGoods is attempting to make Herpesyl look like it was a research subject, but, in fact, it has never been part of a study. This is a very common practice among unofficial supplement vendors. The vendor searches the Internet high and low, looking for studies related to their supplements. A backlink is added in the content, so consumers can validate the vendor’s medical claims.

BuyGoods – No Side Effects

The Herpesyl formula consists of Graviola leaf, burdock, pomegranate, quercetin seeds, red raspberry, grape seed, shiitake, and turmeric, all of which BuyGoods claims do not have side effects.

If you conduct a bit of research on each of these ingredients, you may be surprised to discover, most or all of them have side effects. Burdock, for example, is believed to alter blood glucose levels. While the evidence is nonexistent, burdock may decrease blood sugar to life-threatening lows in people who are taking diabetes medicine.

Image: Herpesyel.com

Quercetin, when taken in high doses, may cause kidney damage, according to 56 Preliminary evidence. Shiitake, derived from mushrooms, has been linked to severe allergic reactions. Shiitake mushrooms are like peanuts and shellfish, as they cause a severe reaction in people with food allergies and asthma.

So, to say a natural dietary supplement is 100 percent free of side effects should be a crime.

Afterword – Herpesyl Scam

Is Herpesyl a scam? Is BuyGoods a scam? Let’s start off by saying, Herpesyl is not a cure for HSV. BuyGoods should not claim its Herpesyl kills the herpes virus because it is not an antiviral drug.

The BBB review by Jeremy R. could not have said it better. BuyGoods and other unofficial vendors buy press releases, in an attempt to legitimize themselves. BuyGoods has taken legitimacy to an all-new level, incorporating its business. However, the Boise address is fishy because it belongs to Divinci Virtual Office. A virtual office is not a brick-and-mortar office. It is nothing more than an address. There is no office, no workers, or office equipment.

Image: BuyGoods

The vendor also claims its supplement is manufactured in an “FDA-approved” facility in the United States. There is no evidence to back up these claims.

BuyGoods claims to have partnered with a medical doctor known as Adrian Kavanagh, without providing legitimate credentials. A Google search limits Dr. Kavanagh to being connected to Herpesyl. A professional license search via the Idaho Board of Medicine website rendered results for Dr. Joseph James Kavanagh who is no longer active.

Image: Idaho Professional License Verification

It is possible, Jeremy R. hit the nail on the head. Dr. Adrian Kavanagh is probably nothing more than a fictional character. Again, there is no evidence to back up these claims.

If BuyGoods is legitimate, the company should provide evidence needed to validate its Dr. Kavanagh, effectiveness, and Herpesyl cure claims.

Consumers need to be aware of the risks involved in buying supplements from online vendors. Yes, BuyGoods is an Idaho-registered business, but there is no evidence that proves it is actually located in Idaho or Delaware. A virtual office address is not proof.

The content is not written by an American English writer because it is filled with grammar errors.

Last, but not least, BuyGoods needs to provide consumers with a copy of its third-party testing, if there is one.

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